Besides stoneflies, riffles and runs are full of caddis larvae!  And you can match most of the with a Green Rock Worm nymph pattern.

My Krystal Flash green rock worm nymph pattern.  I fish this all year in sizes 12-16.

Rhyacophila sp. larva dorsal view.

Rhyacophila sp. larva ventral view.

Rhyacophila pupa in pupal shelter (left).

Rhyacophila sp. adult.

The shelter and net of a net-spinning caddis larva on the side of a submerged branch that was lifted from the stream.

This green colored species of net-spinning caddis larva can easily be mistaken for a green rock worm larva.

A net-spinning caddis pupa (above) and adult (below).

The green rock worm adult (above) is larger and has different colored wings than the net-spinning caddis (below).

This photo shows the long flexible looking maxillary palpi of net-spinning caddis adults. 

Just like the larvae, net-spinning caddis pupae (above) have obvious tufts of gills along the underside of their abdomen, while the underside of a the green rock worm pupae (below) have none.

Net-spinning caddis larva (above) have obvious tufts of gills along the underside of their abdomen, while the underside of a the green rock worm’s abdomen (below) is bare.